Go Red For Women https://www.goredforwomen.org Tue, 22 Jul 2014 15:42:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Women Fare Worse Than Men After Heart Attack https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart_disease_research-subcategory/women-fare-worse-men-heart-attack/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=women-fare-worse-men-heart-attack https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart_disease_research-subcategory/women-fare-worse-men-heart-attack/#comments Mon, 16 Jun 2014 22:38:00 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21527 Women age 55 or younger may fare worse than their male counterparts […]

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Women age 55 or younger may fare worse than their male counterparts after having a heart attack, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2014. Researchers studied records and interviews of 3,501 people (67 percent women) who had heart attacks in the United States and Spain in 2008-12. One year after their heart attack,women were more likely than men to have:

  • Poorer physical functioning
  • Poorer mental functioning
  • Lower quality of life
  • More chest pain
  • Worse physical limitations

“Previous studies show young women have a greater burden of pre-existing risk factors,” said Rachel P. Dreyer, Ph.D., the study’s first author and a post-doctoral research associate in cardiovascular medicine at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Conn. “These factors have shown to be more strongly associated with adverse outcomes in women than men.” Women’s poorer health outcomes may be due to a range of socio-demographic, clinical and biological causes, such as undetected chest pain, problems with access to care and increase in work/life responsibilities impacting their health, she said. “Our results can be important in developing treatments specifically designed to improve young women’s recovery after a heart attack.” Dreyer said. “We need to identify women at higher risk as well as think about care after they are discharged.” Learn more heart disease research on Go Red For Women.

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The Idaho® Potato Truck Supports Go Red https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart-disease-news/idaho-potato-truck-supports-go-red/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=idaho-potato-truck-supports-go-red https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart-disease-news/idaho-potato-truck-supports-go-red/#comments Thu, 12 Jun 2014 23:11:32 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21517 The head-turning Great Big Idaho Truck is back on the road for […]

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The head-turning Great Big Idaho Truck is back on the road for its cross-country tour with a new message for women: Take care of your heart!

Visit BigIdahoPotato.com to find out where the big spud will be next and try this delicious Spanish-Style Potato Tortilla.

Spanish-Style Potato Tortilla

Serves 6; 1 wedge per serving

Not to be confused with Mexican tortillas, the Spanish tortilla is a traditional egg-and-potato dish similar to a thick, robust omelet or Italian frittata. Serve it as a breakfast entrée with a side of fresh fruit.

1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound potatoes, quartered lengthwise, then thinly sliced crosswise
1 medium onion, chopped
1 1/2 cups egg substitute
1/2 cup shredded manchego curado cheese
1 4-ounce jar diced pimiento, drained well

1. Preheat the oven to 400°F.

2. In a medium ovenproof skillet, heat the oil over medium-high heat, swirling to coat the bottom.

3. In a large bowl, stir together the potatoes and onion. Transfer the mixture to the skillet. Using a spatula, gently spread and press it into an even layer. Reduce the heat to low. Cook, covered, for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the potatoes are just tender.

4. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the egg substitute, manchego, and pimiento. Pour over the potato mixture. Don’t stir. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the tortilla is set.

5. Slide the tortilla onto a serving plate, or serve directly from the skillet. Cut into 6 wedges.

Cook’s Tip on Manchego Cheese: Manchego is a Spanish cheese made of sheep’s milk. The curado version has been aged and has a mild, nutty flavor and creamy texture. It is commonly found in grocery stores.

On-the-go Breakfast Tip: To eat this tortilla on the move, stuff a wedge into half of a whole-grain pita pocket or wrap it in a corn tortilla. Then wrap wax paper around it or place the bottom half in a sandwich-size plastic bag with the top sticking out.

Nutrition Analysis (per serving)

Calories 152
Total Fat 4.5 g
Saturated Fat 2.0 g
Trans Fat 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat 2.0 g
Cholesterol 7 mg
Sodium 183 mg
Carbohydrates 18 g
Fiber 2 g
Sugars 4 g
Protein 10 g

Dietary Exchanges
1 starch, 1 lean meat

This recipe is reprinted with permission from American Heart Association The Go Red For Women Cookbook, Copyright © 2013 by the American Heart Association. Published by Clarkson Potter/Publishers, a division of Random House, Inc. Available from booksellers everywhere.

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Good Fats Tips https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/first-steps-to-prevent-heart-disease-and-be-heart-healthy/good-fats-tips/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=good-fats-tips https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/first-steps-to-prevent-heart-disease-and-be-heart-healthy/good-fats-tips/#comments Thu, 15 May 2014 17:39:05 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21358 Saturated and trans fats are bad for you, while monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats can actually be good for you. Explore more good fats tips.

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Not all fats are created equal. While saturated and trans fats are bad for you, monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats can actually be good for you. How as that possible?

“Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are healthy fats because they do not raise HDL cholesterol (good cholesterol) levels,” says Dr. Rachel Johnson, Robert L. Bickford Jr. Green and Gold Professor of Nutrition at the University of Vermont. “They also seem to have an anti-inflammatory affect and studies have shown that people who have that diets rich in these types of fats have lower rates of heart disease and diabetes.”

Let’s explore these good fats tips.

Foods containing good fats

Interested in starting a diet that is rich in healthy fats? If so, head to the grocery store and stock up on vegetable oils. This can include everything from olive oil and canola oil to peanut oil and sesame oil. Monounsaturated fats are found in these oils as well as avocados, olives and various types of nuts, including almonds and peanuts.

Eating fish is an excellent way to incorporate polyunsaturated fats into your diet. Fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, trout and tuna are excellent options and also are high in Omega-3 fatty acids—known to help with inflammation.

Managing intake of good fats

How often should a person consume healthy fats? “Every day,” says Johnson. “Just be careful about calories. Foods with healthy fats can be high in calories.”

Dr. Judith Wylie-Rosett, professor of epidemiology and population health at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, concurs. “The problem with good fats is that it is easy to consume too many calories,” she says. “For example, if you have a child that is very active and lean, nuts are a wonderful snack. But if you have someone who is overweight, they may get too many calories going out to eat and munching on nuts at the dinner table.”

The American Heart Association recommends people eat foods with monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats instead of saturated and trans fats. Aim for healthy fats to not exceed 35 percent of your total daily calories, according to the AHA. To control portions, try just a handful of nuts or olives for a snack.

Learn more about good fat versus bad fat on Go Red For Women.

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Cardiovascular Risk Linked to Mental Function https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart_disease_research-subcategory/cardiovascular-risk-linked-mental-function/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=cardiovascular-risk-linked-mental-function https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart_disease_research-subcategory/cardiovascular-risk-linked-mental-function/#comments Tue, 06 May 2014 14:37:29 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21290 Cardiovascular risk factors as a young adult may influence your chance of staying mentally sharp in mid-life, according to new research from the American Heart Association.

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Cardiovascular health linked to cognitive function later in life

Being heart healthy as a young adult  may increase your chance of staying mentally sharp in mid-life, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

In a 25-year study on 3,381 people, 18- to 30-years-old, those with blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol levels slightly higher than the Association’s recommended guidelines, scored lower on cognitive function tests in their 40s and 50s. Standardized scores on three cognitive tests were between 0.06 to 0.30 points less, on average, for each standard deviation increase in cumulative exposure to these risk factors, which the researchers considered significant for this age group. Standard deviation is the amount of variation from the average.

“It’s amazing that as a young adult, mildly elevated cardiovascular risks seem to matter for your brain health later in life,” said Kristine Yaffe, M.D., study author and a neuropsychiatrist, epidemiologist and professor at the University of California-San Francisco. “We’re not talking about old age issues, but lifelong issues.”

This is one of the first comprehensive long-term studies looking at key heart disease and stroke risk factors’ effects on cognitive function in this age group. Prior research showed similar effects of mid-life and late-life cardiovascular health on brainpower in late life.

The study was part of the ongoing multi-center Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Participants had their blood pressure, fasting blood sugar and cholesterol levels checked every two to five years. Researchers analyzed each person’s cumulative cardiovascular health over 25 years.  The American Heart Association defines ideal cardiovascular health as systolic blood pressure <120 mm Hg, diastolic blood pressure <80 mm Hg, blood sugar <100 mg/dL, and cholesterol < 200 mg/dL.

At the end of the study, participants took three tests measuring memory, thinking speed and mental flexibility.

Elevated blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol are three major risk factors for atherosclerosis, the slow narrowing of arteries caused by a build-up of plaque in the artery walls leading to the brain and heart.

The narrowing of the arteries leading to and in the brain is the most likely explanation for the link between cardiovascular health and cognitive function, Yaffe said.

“Our study is hopeful, because it tells us we could maybe make a dent in the risks of Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia by emphasizing the importance of controlling risk factors among younger people,” she said.

Learn more heart disease research on Go Red For Women.

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Life’s Simple 7 https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/first-steps-to-prevent-heart-disease-and-be-heart-healthy/lifes-simple-7/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=lifes-simple-7 https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/first-steps-to-prevent-heart-disease-and-be-heart-healthy/lifes-simple-7/#comments Sat, 03 May 2014 19:44:35 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21275 Do you know there are seven easy ways to help control your risk for heart disease? Manage your heart risk by understanding "Life's Simple 7."

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Do you know there are seven easy ways to help control your risk for heart disease? Manage your heart risk by understanding “Life’s Simple 7.”

1. Get active

Daily physical activity increases your length and quality of life. If you get at least 30 minutes of moderate physical activity each day (like brisk walking), five times per week, you can almost guarantee yourself a healthier and more satisfying life while lowering your risks for heart disease, stroke and diabetes.

What To Do

Start by learning the basics about fitness. Also, children need 60 minutes a day–every day–of physical activity, so find ways to workout with your kids to help ensure their heart health in addition to your own.

2. Control cholesterol

When you control your cholesterol, you are giving your arteries their best chance to remain clear of blockages. Cholesterol is a waxy substance and our bodies use it to make cell membranes and some hormones, but when you have too much bad cholesterol (LDL), it combines with white blood cells and forms plaque in your veins and arteries. These blockages lead to heart disease and stroke.

What To Do

Try these tips to lower cholesterol with diet and foods.

3. Eat better

Healthy foods are the fuel our bodies use to make new cells and create the energy we need to thrive and fight diseases. If you are frequently skipping out on veggies, fruit, low-fat dairy, fiber-rich whole grains, and lean meats including fish, your body is missing the basic building blocks for a healthy life.

What To Do

Want more ways to eat better? Try these tips:

  • Track what you eat with a food diary
  • Eat vegetables and fruits
  • Eat unrefined fiber-rich whole-grain foods
  • Eat fish twice a week
  • Cut back on added sugars and saturated fats

4. Manage blood pressure

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke. When your blood pressure stays within healthy ranges, you reduce the strain on your heart, arteries, and kidneys which keeps you healthier longer.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, means the blood running through your arteries flows with too much force and puts pressure on your arteries, stretching them past their healthy limit and causing microscopic tears. Our body then kicks into injury-healing mode to repair these tears with scar tissue. But unfortunately, the scar tissue traps plaque and white blood cells which can form into blockages, blood clots, and hardened, weakened arteries.

What To Do

To manage blood pressure, you should:

5. Lose weight

If you have too much fat — especially if a lot of it is at your waist — you’re at higher risk for such health problems as high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol and diabetes. If you’re overweight or obese, you can reduce your risk for heart disease by successfully losing weight and keeping it off. Even losing as few as five or ten pounds can produce a dramatic blood pressure reduction.

What To Do

Calculate your body mass index (BMI) to help you determine if you need to lose weight.

6. Reduce blood sugar

Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose (or blood sugar) that our bodies use for energy. Your body makes a hormone called insulin that acts like a carrier to take your food energy into your cells. If your fasting blood sugar level is below 100, you are in the healthy range. If not, your results could indicate diabetes or pre-diabetes.

Although diabetes is treatable and you can live a healthy life with this condition, even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. In fact, most people with diabetes die from some form of heart or blood vessel disease.

What To Do

The following tips can all help reduce your blood sugar:

  • Reduce consumption of simple sugars that are found in soda, candy and sugary desserts
  • Get regular physical activity! Moderate intensity aerobic physical activity directly helps your body respond to insulin
  • Take medications or insulin if it is prescribed for you

7. Stop smoking

Cigarette smokers have a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. If you smoke, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health. Smoking damages your entire circulatory system, and increases your risk for coronary heart disease, hardened arteries, aneurysm and blood clots. Like a line of tumbling dominoes, one risk creates another. Blood clots and hardened arteries increase your risks for heart attack, stroke and peripheral artery disease. Smoking can also reduce your good cholesterol (HDL) and your lung capacity, making it harder to get the physical activity you need for better health.

What To Do

Whatever it takes for you to stop smoking, it is worth it! Visit the American Heart Association’s Quit Smoking website for tools and resources.

Learn more about “Life’s Simple 7″ and take action with MyLifeCheck from the American Heart Association.

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Fitbit® Supports Go Red For Women https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart-disease-news/introducing-new-go-red-flex-fitbit/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=introducing-new-go-red-flex-fitbit https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/heart-disease-news/introducing-new-go-red-flex-fitbit/#comments Fri, 02 May 2014 20:14:51 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21263 Throughout May 2014, Fitbit® will donate $10 of every Red Flex wristband and $2 of every Red Flex accessory band sold to the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement for a total of $50,000.

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Throughout May 2014, Fitbit® donated $10 of every Red Flex wristband sold and $2 of every Red Flex accessory band sold to the American Heart Association’s Go Red For Women movement to raise a total of $50,000. Together, we can take steps towards fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke in women.

To learn more about Fitbit’s support of Go Red For Women, visit www.fitbit.com/flex.

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Fitness Basics https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/heart-healthy-exercises/fitness-basics/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=fitness-basics https://www.goredforwomen.org/live-healthy/heart-healthy-exercises/fitness-basics/#comments Wed, 30 Apr 2014 13:52:26 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21186 Wondering what you need to know to improve your physical fitness and help reduce your heart disease risk? Let's start with these fitness basics.

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Wondering what you need to know to improve your physical fitness and help reduce your heart disease risk? Let’s start with these fitness basics.

Physical activity is anything that makes you move your body and burn calories.

For people who would benefit from lowering their blood pressure or cholesterol, the American Heart Association recommends 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity three to four times a week to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke.

Below are several key types of exercise that can all help you improve your level of fitness.

1. Strength and resistance training

Strength and resistance training are important elements of a good physical activity routine. The American Heart Association recommends strength training at least twice per week.

A well-rounded strength-training program provides the following benefits:

  • Increased strength of bones, muscles and connective tissues (tendons and ligaments)
  • Lower risk of injury
  • Increased muscle mass, which makes it easier for your body to burn calories and thus maintain a healthy weight
  • Better quality of life

2. Walking and running

Walking is a great way to get you moving with minimal impact on your body. It’s also low-risk and easy to start. While the AHA recommends that adults get 150 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity each week, even short 10 minute activity sessions can be added up over the week to reach this goal.

A regular walking program can also:

  • Improve your cholesterol profile
  • Lower blood pressure
  • Increase your energy and stamina
  • Boost bone strength
  • Prevent weight gain

Do you want to start jogging or running but aren’t sure how? Dr. Deborah Rohm Young, vice chair of the AHA’s Physical Activity Subcommittee, encourages women to start by setting small goals. Begin by walking 15 minutes four times per week, Young suggests. “You can experience an increased sense of wellbeing almost immediately,” she says. “From there, you can have more energy to do other things.”

3. Yoga

Yoga is an ancient practice with potential mental and physical health benefits for people of all ages.

Practicing yoga—as part of an overall healthy lifestyle—can:

  • Help lower blood pressure
  • Increase lung capacity
  • Improve respiratory function
  • Boost circulation and
  • Tone muscles
  • Give you a sense of well-being while building strength

In addition, yoga poses require stretching, increasing flexibility.

Flexibility activities are an appropriate part of a physical activity program. Note however that yoga does not count toward the 150-minutes-per-week of recommended moderate activity. That’s due in part because some forms of yoga do not raise the heart rate enough to achieve moderate intensity aerobic activity for a sustained period.

Try these yoga moves to improve your heart health.

Learn more about different types of exercises, including swimming and bicycling, to find what is right for you.

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Tips for Taking Heart Medications https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/living-with-heart-disease/tips-taking-heart-medications/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=tips-taking-heart-medications https://www.goredforwomen.org/about-heart-disease/living-with-heart-disease/tips-taking-heart-medications/#comments Tue, 22 Apr 2014 20:51:24 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21155 If you have a heart condition, managing your medicines can be difficult. Try these tips for taking heart medications to help keep you and your heart healthy.

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With all of the different medicines available for all of the things that ail us, keeping track of them can be overwhelming. If you have a heart condition, managing your medicines can be doubly difficult. Chances are that you take more than one medicine daily, whether it’s a prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) drug. Each medicine may treat a different symptom or problem, and each comes with separate instructions.

Try these tips for taking heart medication to help keep you and your heart healthy.

1. Talk with your doctor and pharmacist

You need to take all your medicines as directed for them to be most effective. Your doctor and pharmacist can help you better understand the correct amounts and when and how often to take both prescription and OTC medicines. To be fully informed, talk with your doctor. Whether you’re taking prescribed medicines, OTC drugs or both, get the answers to these questions:

  • Should I take this medicine instead of another drug that I’ve been prescribed, or is this an additional treatment?
  • What is this medicine supposed to do for me?
  • What are some common side effects?
  • Are there any interactions with my other prescriptions or OTC medicines?
  • Which foods, supplements and activities could interfere with this medicine?
  • Are there any special storage requirements?
  • What should I do if I miss a dose?
  • How long does it take this drug to take effect?

2. Share your information

The American Heart Association recommends making your doctor and pharmacist aware of all the medicines you are taking. This means both prescription and OTC medicines. Let your physician and pharmacist know about any allergies you have. Don’t forget to mention which supplements, herbs, or vitamins you use. Some medicines, foods and supplements or vitamins could conflict with each other and cause problems. If possible, try to go to the same pharmacy each time you fill a prescription.

There are benefits to having all of your prescriptions filled at one pharmacy, says Selig D. Corman, R.Ph., director of professional affairs at the Pharmacists Society of the State of New York in Albany. “That provides a complete patient profile so the pharmacist can efficiently counsel proper use of medicines and prevent possible interactions. Also, the pharmacist can determine if the patient is compliant because of intervals between refills.” If the interval between refills is too long, it indicates that a patient could be skipping doses.

On the flip side, notes Selig, if the time between refills is too frequent, this could mean that a patient is taking more medicine than the doctor has prescribed. For your safety, your pharmacist can monitor the timeliness of your refills and alert you if anything out of the ordinary raises a red flag.

It’s also important to try and buy any OTC medicines at the same pharmacy where you get your prescriptions filled. That way, if you have questions about whether an OTC medicine will interact with prescription medicines you are taking, the pharmacist can let you know because he or she will have access to your prescription records.

3. Mind your meds

Keeping track of your medicines on a daily basis is also important. This can become a challenge if you have to take several different medicines each day. But there are ways to help you remember what you have already taken on any given day and what you still need to take. A plastic pillbox marked with days of the week can be very useful for this purpose. Just be sure to keep it and all medicines up and out of the sight of children who are in, or may visit your home.

You can also keep a list with the names and dosages of all the medicines you’re taking, both prescription and OTC. Be sure to include when you should take them. “The list should be kept in [your] wallet,” says Sophia De Monte, R.Ph., spokeswoman for the American Pharmacists Association. This way you always have it with you. It’s also a good idea to put the list in a visible place at home, like on your fridge.

“For convenience,” she adds, “dosing is scheduled with an easily remembered event—at meals, bedtime, first thing in the morning, breakfast and dinner.” It’s important to follow labeled dosing instructions, so make taking your medicines part of your daily routine. Associate a dose with a daily event.

Upon taking each dose, check off a box on a piece of paper or a calendar. You can even download a medicine tracker app to your smartphone.

Be consistent

“It’s very important to take your medicines consistently,” says Daniel Spogen, M.D., a professor and chairman of family medicine at the University of Nevada, Reno. “Almost always, you want to take them at the same time of day.”

Of course, there are times when you can’t. For instance, you may not feel up to taking your medicine when you feel sick to your stomach or have a cold or the flu. When you can’t take your medicine at the usual time, you might be able to take it later that day. But be sure to ask your doctor first. This helps keep a steady level of medicine in your bloodstream, Spogen says.

Play it safe

Managing your medicines may be a bit time-consuming. But it’s important if you want to avoid problems from getting too much or too little of what you need. Taking some extra time to keep your prescription and OTC medicines safe and properly taking the medicines your doctor recommends will go a long way in helping you stay healthy.

Learn more about managing your heart medications on Go Red For Women.

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Wen Mai Wong: 2014 Multicultural Scholar https://www.goredforwomen.org/uncategorized/wen-mai-wong-2014-multicultural-scholar/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=wen-mai-wong-2014-multicultural-scholar https://www.goredforwomen.org/uncategorized/wen-mai-wong-2014-multicultural-scholar/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:20:29 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21133 “I quickly realized how I could impact someone’s life through simple things […]

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“I quickly realized how I could impact someone’s life through simple things such as refiling prescriptions, transporting patients or through a simple conversation.” – Wen Mai Wong

Wen Mai Wong is a sophomore at St. Mary’s University. She began volunteering every Sunday at a local hospital at a young age under the encouragement and direction of her parents. Once she started, it didn’t take long for Wen Mai to realize how much she could do to help people. This triggered her aspiration to become a physician investigator.

Learn more about the Go Red™ Multicultural Scholarship Fund.

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Toni King: 2014 Multicultural Scholar https://www.goredforwomen.org/uncategorized/toni-king-2014-multicultural-scholar/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=toni-king-2014-multicultural-scholar https://www.goredforwomen.org/uncategorized/toni-king-2014-multicultural-scholar/#comments Mon, 21 Apr 2014 17:10:49 +0000 https://www.goredforwomen.org/?p=21122 “Expenses like gas and groceries have become the luxuries in my house, […]

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“Expenses like gas and groceries have become the luxuries in my house, and I am struggling to even obtain those. This scholarship will alleviate some of the financial burden I am experiencing. It will allow me to focus on my studies and achieve my goal – to help the people who are so desperately waiting for someone like me to come along.” — Toni King

Toni King is in her second year of graduate school at Frontier Nursing University.  As a single mother of three young boys she has a strong awareness of minority health disparities. Toni is committed to becoming the first and only African American midwife nurse in Cincinnati, OH, where infant mortality rates are comparable to some third world countries, especially in African American communities.

Toni has a strong family history of heart disease and she, along with her mother and siblings, all live with high blood pressure. She lost her grandfather to a massive heart attack and this fuels her mission to help the less fortunate and live out her passion to help decrease infant mortality and health disparities.

Learn more about the Go Red™ Multicultural Scholarship Fund.

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