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Odds of dying from sudden cardiac arrest due to sex is low, study says

A new study says that the odds of dying from sudden cardiac arrest due to sex is extremely low – even for people with heart disease.

Researchers analyzed records on 4,557 sudden cardiac arrest deaths around Portland, Oregon, between 2002 and 2015 and found that only 32 men and two women died of cardiac arrest during or within an hour of sexual intercourse.

Whether the risk during sex is higher or lower than resting or exercising wasn’t determined because researchers didn’t have enough information about frequency of sexual activity, according to the study published Sunday in Journal of the American College of Cardiology and presented at American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions.


 Are women less likely to receive CPR?

Men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public locations compared to women, and they are more likely to survive after the life-saving measure, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Using data from the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium, a network of regional clinical centers in the United States and Canada studying out-of-hospital treatments of cardiac arrest and trauma, researchers analyzed 19,331 cardiac events in the home and in public.


 Risks for blood clot in a vein may rise with increased TV viewing

Risk of blood clots increases with the amount of time spent watching television, even if people get the recommended amount of physical activity, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

“Watching TV itself isn’t likely bad, but we tend to snack and sit still for prolonged periods while watching,” said Mary Cushman, M.D., M.Sc., co-author of the study and professor of medicine at the Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont in Burlington.


 Mom becomes caregiver after teen daughter’s stroke

 Jasmine Harris had a stroke six months before her high school graduation.

It started with a headache a couple days before Christmas. But the headache didn’t go away after taking a pain reliever. Then, the day after Christmas, she began vomiting in the middle of the night. La’Wana figured it was a stomach virus. La’Wana was picking up ginger ale and crackers the next morning when she got a frantic call from Jasmine.