Know Your Numbers?

They could just save your life.

Start by Knowing Your Numbers

You can’t manage what you don’t measure, which is why knowing your risk is critical to preventing cardiovascular disease. And knowing your risk starts with knowing your numbers.

Talk to your healthcare provider today to learn about your Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and BMI (Body Mass Index).

Your heart depends on it.

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Go Red For Women® | The Heart Truth® - Know Your Numbers

We women sure know a lot of numbers by heart, like phone numbers, birthdays, pin numbers and passwords. But do you know the most critical numbers for your heart health? That knowledge could just save your life.

That's why Go Red For Women and The Heart Truth are encouraging all women to schedule a visit with their doctor to learn their personal health numbers including Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Blood Sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI) and assess their risk for heart disease and stroke.

It’s time to learn the most critical numbers in Your life. Your heart depends on it.

The Important Numbers

Knowing your numbers is important! The American Heart Association recommends that you be aware of five key numbers: Total Cholesterol, HDL (good) Cholesterol, Blood Pressure, Blood Sugar and Body Mass Index (BMI).

These numbers are important because they will allow you and your healthcare provider to determine your risk for developing Cardiovascular Disease by Atherosclerosis. This includes conditions such as Angina (chest pain), Heart Attack, Stroke (caused by Blood Clots) and Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD).

These numbers are important because they will allow you and your healthcare provider to determine your risk for developing Cardiovascular Disease by Atherosclerosis.

Ideal numbers for most adults are:

Blood Pressure

120 / 80 mm Hg

Body Mass Index (BMI)

25 kg / m2

Fasting Blood Sugar

100 mg / dL

Total Cholesterol / HDL (Good Cholesterol)

Get your cholesterol checked and talk to your doctor about your numbers and how they impact your HDL (good) cholesterol and your overall risk.