Latest Research

Did you know that more than 2,200 Americans die of heart disease every single day? That’s one death every 39 seconds. And on average, someone in the United States suffers a stroke every 40 seconds, while a stroke-related death occurs about every four minutes.

Such an aggressive disease requires an equally aggressive response. That’s why The American Heart Association (AHA) has spent more than $3.3 billion on research, ever increasing our knowledge and understanding about heart disease and stroke – also making AHA the largest funder of heart disease research, second only to the U.S. government.

Our mission can be summed up in one challenging 10-year goal: To improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20 percent by 2020.

Learn more about our goals, cutting-edge research initiatives and how you can make a difference.

The American Heart Association (AHA) has spent more than $3.3 billion on research, ever increasing our knowledge and understanding about heart disease and stroke.

Research Takes Deep Dive Into Women’s Health

Four collaborative projects researching heart disease in women will focus on fasting, meditation, estrogen levels and the psychology of exercise.

Cardiovascular Risk Linked to Mental Function

Cardiovascular risk factors as a young adult may influence your chance of staying mentally sharp in mid-life, according to new research from the American Heart Association.

Insomnia May Significantly Raise Stroke Risk

The risk of stroke may be much higher in people with insomnia compared to those who don’t have trouble sleeping, according to new research.

Anxiety Linked to Long-Term Stroke Risk

The greater the anxiety level, the higher risk of having a stroke, according to new research from the AHA. Learn stress management strategies to help cope with your stress.

Children’s Cardiovascular Fitness Declining

Research shows children's cardiovascular fitness declining worldwide. Learn more about what impacts children's cardiovascular health and ways to keep your family heart healthy.

Heart Disease Causes Pregnancy-Related Deaths

Heart disease is the leading cause of women’s pregnancy-related deaths in California — but nearly one-third could be prevented, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Environmental Toxins, Heart Risk in Children

Children’s congenital heart defects may be associated with their mothers’ exposure to specific mixtures of environmental toxins during pregnancy, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2013.

Exercise Could Lower High Blood Pressure Risk

New research from the American Heart Association shows exercising more than four hours per week can lower your blood pressure by up to 19 percent.

Positive Patients Exercise, Live Longer

Heart disease patients with positive attitudes are likely to exercise and live longer, according to new research.